Main Site Documentation

Multicolor Led DaisyLink module (Arduino style)


#1

Chasing few last bugs and it should be ready. With this arduino library, prototyping DaisyLink modules will be as easy as turning led on and off. ;D

Btw. Powered Arduino works like a power module as well


#2

I can’t wait! I’m eager to see your Arduino programmer released also. Do you think it could be adapted to program the TQFP ATMega328 chips? Then we would really be in business for creating DL modules.


#3

It is actually much better. Avr code can be uploaded through “*” socket using Extender module and a programmer like Seesd’s Bus Pirate. If the uploaded code is Arduino bootloader then the module becomes an arduino and can be programmed using Serial-USB module through “XY” socket. For that you will need to use Arduino programming environment and you sketch writing skills. ;D

I haven’t tested programming parts, yet, but this is the plan.


#4

This is a real good use for 8bit arduino. I think many will benefit from this… thanks to the “king”


#5

Nice! Any chance we could see the other side of that thing?


#6

The other side is Arduino Uno and DuinoProto is attached to it as a shield. Is that what you are asking?


#7

Yep, just wondering if you added Arduino parts directly to the proto board or not.


#8

We should tweet this when you blog about it.


#9

@ ransomhall

No, not yet. Thinking about the best way of doing it, not much room left for piezo :wink:

@ Gus

sure


#10

w00t, Valen gets some Dangerous Prototypes coverage: http://dangerousprototypes.com/2012/01/25/arduino-based-daisylink-module-for-net-gagetteer/

(double w00t - the hyperlink icon disappeared, but it works automagically, thanks Josh !)


#11

Wow! Awesome, thanks for pointing it out! :dance:


#12

That’s really nice.

By the way, there is a misspell in the article title. “Gagetteer”. IS there any way that is get fixed?


#13

Congrats! You put the magic word in…“Arduino”. :wink:


#14

Thank you!

@ Joe

I left a comment on that post, let’s see if they will fix it.


#15

You know, I was just reading through the DaisyLink spec thinking “crap, I could use some code to help me visualize this”. I just emailed the product team before seeing this :slight_smile:

Awesome that you’ve done this. Have you shared the code yet? If so, can you point me to it?

I’m working with an ATmega1284p, but the theories still apply.

Pete


#16

Pete, did you see the sample code on codeplex for the multicolorled module from Microsoft? There’s obviously a lot of magic that happens in the compiler they are using but you can see how it goes. I started down the same path as Architect but after a few weeks I decided it was going to take a lot more time than I had considering I knew he had already figured this out. I’m eager to see and start using his results.


#17

@ ian

Thanks

Kerry replied to me with the same info just a minute ago. I didn’t realize the PSoC code was up there. I’m looking at it now. And yes, lots of magic.

I2C is always a bit odd anyway. I prefer SPI, but then you have to have all those CS lines (or a good approach for multiplexing them).

On the plus side, once you write it once, it’s written.

I’ve actually been a bit surprised there aren’t more DaisyLink modules. I know the chip and its supporting components add cost, but it’s nice not to tie up all the sockets.


#18

I’m not…after attempting it myself. There is very little info and only one example for how to do it. I really believe that once Architect releases his code we’ll see a lot more. Now, if one of you genius would design something that can cheaply and easily program a TQFP ATMegaxxx chip then we can have some real fun. Or perhaps it exists and I haven’t found it yet?


#19

@ Pete

I had one last bug to figure out and it should be ready. I will make everything available this weekend, hopefully.

If you really need it earlier, let me know.


#20

[quote]Now, if one of you genius would design something that can cheaply and easily program a TQFP ATMegaxxx chip then we can have some real fun. Or perhaps it exists and I haven’t found it yet?
[/quote]

I was curious about that myself. When you throw in different MCUs with something like NETMF, there’s a much better than zero chance that the person using the module/shield lacks the programming hardware and tools. But, you still need to get updated code to the device.

I have an ISP and a JTAG programmer, but I bet (other than some other people in this thread) most Gadgeteer users do not. Even then, the ones I have are specific to AVR, and wouldn’t work with other processors.

A lot of MIDI / synth solutions send it all through sysex to a custom bootloader. It’s a pretty reasonable assumption that the user will have the right hardware in place to do that.

I’m not sure what Architect has in mind, but I could see copying a hex file to an SD card and then having a way to use DaisyLink to do some sort of two wire programming (depends on device), using a custom program on the Gadgeteer.

Another approach might be to have a couple extra pins on the specific module (easy on Arduino, needs to be thought of in advance on custom modules) which you tell the user to jump to pins X,Y,Z on socket N in order to do serial programming.

@ Architect

[quote]I had one last bug to figure out and it should be ready. I will make everything available this weekend, hopefully.

If you really need it earlier, let me know.[/quote]

I’m in no hurry, thanks. I’ll take a peek when it’s done :slight_smile: (oh, and you just know that code needs to be ported to C# for Panda and Netduino. I want a giant chain of cooperating NETMF devices just to say I have it )

Pete