Main Site Documentation

Updated Gadgeteer Socket Soldering tutorial, and sourcing info


#1

I just put up a post with info on where to get sockets, as well as a tutorial on what I’ve found to be an effective approach to hand soldering them.

http://10rem.net/blog/2012/04/16/where-to-get-net-gadgeteer-and-netduino-go-compatible-10-pin-idc-sockets-and-how-to-solder-them

Pete


#2

As always, very well done.


#3

Thanks Gus :slight_smile:


#4

Hmm. I guess I’m spoiled. I never considered these a challenge to solder…

Step one: dont buy a radioshack iron.
step two: flux is your friend.

the end.


#5

@ soldermonkey

I don’t find C pointer manipulation difficult, yet many people do.

The world is full of people with skills at all levels in different area. :slight_smile:

Pete


#6

I have found that making a comment on how something is “simple/easy” often gets me in trouble. :-[


#7

With soldering I have found that good tools goes a long way to make up for inexperiance.


#8

Yep. Good tools do help.

When you combine good tools with experience, you get this:

I have one of those tips on order now :slight_smile:

I had been waiting to pull the plug on a Hakko iron. I like my Weller, and will still use it, but I’ve also wanted a Hakko. That combined with some adsense revenue clinched it :slight_smile: (having a couple irons at the ready will also make it easier to work)

Pete


#9

My knockoff 936B is such a giant leap over anything I’ve ever soldered with before, I could hardly believe how much difference it made. I don’t even have the really fancy tips for it (yet).

However, the one lesson I’m learning is: use more flux.


#10

Same here. It’s a bit messy and sticky, but what a huge difference it makes, especially when dealing with connectors/sockets and other parts that tend to sit on shelves for a bit.

Pete


#11

What flux are you using? I’ve been using the Kester 959T (no clean, low solids). The problem I have is that it evaporates almost as soon as I stick an iron to it. When I watch some of the training videos it seems their flux stays fluid a long time.


#12

Kester pen. #186 Rosin RMA. I also have several other pens from them, but I haven’t yet tried them out to see if they are better/worse.

I also use two different thicknesses of Kester 63/37 RMA solder. I’ve found this works quite a bit better than the cheap radio shack stuff I started with (no surprise there). That crap left a complete mess on my board regardless of temperature.

I usually keep my iron around 640F

Pete


#13

I’m using the 959T, because I’m lazy. Some kimwipes though would do me good, and then the other fluxes may be better.


#14

So far, the kim wipes, some alcohol, and the horse hair and hog bristle brushes seem to do a good job. The kim wipes are strong enough to be the layer in-between the board and the brush.

I have dedicated flux cleaner spray as well, but it makes the whole place smell like WD 40, and it’s hard to control as it’s a spray.Good for cleaning larger boards, though, but not cheap, and it takes a lot to clean a board.

I’m still learning here, though (I’ve only been soldering for a bit over a year), so I may change my mind later :slight_smile:

Pete


#15

For anyone soldering in their home, I would recomend you avoid the RMA type solders. They are some pretty nasty chemicals lingering around the room while you are soldering. If you get a chance to read the MSDS it will keep you up at night with nightmares.
The RMA stuff is really for production or rework where you have professional cleaning equipment available to get it back off again, FYI it can be acidic when left on the boards. If you have never had the chance to see a professional board house, the final step in most is to send the assembled boards through something that looks a lot like a dishwasher.

The no clean, low solids stuff is great. It looks like it burns off real quick, but it has done its job in that little time. It’s job being to burn off oxides and other contaminates in the solder/on the pad.


#16

@ soldermonkey

How long have you been soldering?


#17

Speaking of flux… I just got an email from Dangerous Prototypes that I’d won a box of solid rosin flux! :smiley: Has anyone ever tried making their own flux before? I’ll let you know how it works out.

http://dangerousprototypes.com/2012/04/17/giveaway-4-boxes-of-roisn-flux/


#18

Professionally, for about 15 years.
Who didnt get the build it yourself radio kits as a kid? :slight_smile:


#19

[quote]For anyone soldering in their home, I would recomend you avoid the RMA type solders. They are some pretty nasty chemicals lingering around the room while you are soldering. If you get a chance to read the MSDS it will keep you up at night with nightmares.

The RMA stuff is really for production or rework where you have professional cleaning equipment available to get it back off again, FYI it can be acidic when left on the boards. If you have never had the chance to see a professional board house, the final step in most is to send the assembled boards through something that looks a lot like a dishwasher.[/quote]

I won’t dispute that flux, in general, is nasty stuff. However, I’m pretty sure you’re confusing RMA flux with RA flux. RMA flux leaves a hard plastic-like substances on the board which would be good to clean off, but isn’t required.

MSDS for just about anything involved in soldering is nasty, but RMA is one of the most hobby-friendly for hand-soldering, and is one of the least corrosive fluxes.

Pete


#20

If that doesn’t work out, you could always start up a violin maintenance company :slight_smile:

(When I worked at a music store in high school, we sold chunks of rosin to violinists to rub on their horse hair bows. Same stuff?)

Pete