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String.format


#1

Hi

I’m still at an early learnig stage so forgive me if my terminolgy is not correct.

I’m using a t35 display to display some text strings in a WPF window. I want to pad the strings so that dispaly looks like a tabbed list.

I can get the strings to display OK but I’m now trying to format them using String.Format to pad the string as follows:



But when I type 'String.'  I dont get the format option. 

Do I need a specific 'using'  reference to be able to use the string.fromat command?

The list of 'using' directives at top of my code is as follows:-


```cs
using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Threading;
using Microsoft.SPOT;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Presentation;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Presentation.Controls;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Presentation.Media;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Presentation.Shapes;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Touch;
using GHI.Premium.Hardware;
using Microsoft.SPOT.Input;

using Gadgeteer.Networking;
using GT = Gadgeteer;
using GTM = Gadgeteer.Modules;
using Gadgeteer.Modules.GHIElectronics;

Many thanks

Paul


#2
 is not implemented in NETMF. You have to do formatting yourself.

#3

Ah Ha, that solves my problem, thankyou

Is there a complete list of core ‘commands’ etc that are implemented in netmf anywhere? I already understand the need to load hardware specific references.

I’m looking in the API Reference for .NET Micro Framework (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee435793.aspx) which details the format.string commmand

Sorry for all the questions

Paul


#4

Don’t overlook ToString as you can put some formating in it eg (someNumber.ToString(“F3”)


#5

The NETMF documentation for the most part is accurate and if something is not listed there then it is not implemented. I don’t see documentation about Format method. Where did you find it?


#6

I’m dealing with a float, so Single class docs had it…

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee436734.aspx


float f = -1.91482E-06f;
string v = f.ToString("G");
Debug.Print(v);

Result is “-1.914819968e-6”


#7

Also String.Concat is quite useful here.
It accepts an ‘unlimited’ number of object arguments and concatenates these using the Object.ToString() value of each object.