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NETMF v.Next


#1

Interesting bits and pieces: http://forums.netduino.com/index.php?/topic/10941-net-mf-v4next

After a long winter for NETMF, there now appear signs of new life…

Cuno


#2

And what’s more interesting is who wrote the update :wink:


#3

Steve Maillet, you mean? An old hand at NETMF.


#4

Yes, a very good sign i would say…


#5

Interesting read… cant wait to find out more… :dance:


#6

Maybe this would be the place to announce things next week

http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/dotnetConf/2014/-NET-Micro-Framework-and-the-Internet-of-Things


#7

IoT related code?

If the upcoming “big things” amount to nothing but a messaging library for the cool new protocol the kids are using this week, then in my opinion, they can keep it.

Now, if we’re talking about “the public commitment to integrate modern language features (generics, etc.)” (my guess is that “generics” is merely Chris’ wishful speculation), then I say, bring it on.

A lot of NETMF is geared toward the kind of hardware it used to run on (remember Meridian?), and it would be worthwhile to give it a thorough house cleaning.


#8

Something like AMQP light?

I must admit that I don’t care much for generics, but that’s one of the few things Microsoft promised at BUILD 2014.


#9

I admit I’m an IoT skeptic, and maybe that colors my perceptions, but I see no reason to make much noise about something like that. Certainly it wouldn’t merit a release of the framework.

Huh. I guess that’s neat, but in an embedded system, it’s more of a nice-to-have than a must-have.

I’m really new to the game, and every inexperienced, but I’m also old-school, so “throw more hardware at it” is not the right answer, for me. I’d rather see things stripped down to the bare minimum to allow us to run on smaller, cheaper, lower-power micros, than throw every .NET 4.5.2 feature into the framework and require 800MHz machines and 8MB of RAM to run it.


#10

Glad that there are others out there as well :slight_smile: I’m also old school, or maybe I should say Niklaus Wirth school.


#11

Wirth was “The Man”. I still use A+DS=P all the time.


#12

Yeah, I have been incredibly fortunate that I had the opportunity to work in his group during the Oberon project. There we learned how to implement managed code runtimes with dynamic loading and garbage collection on resource-constrained hardware, about 25 years ago. Still profiting from the experience.


#13

[quote=“Cuno”]
Yeah, I have been incredibly fortunate that I had the opportunity to work in his group during the Oberon project. There we learned how to implement managed code runtimes with dynamic loading and garbage collection on resource-constrained hardware, about 25 years ago. Still profiting from the experience.
[/quote]Green with envy as Niklaus Wirth has always been a personal software hero of mine. I suggested to someone the other day what is really needed to refocus visual studio would be to invite Charles Simonyi, Steve McConnell, Jim McCarthy and some of the other old guys back to do a hard review of the development tools (these were guys who knew not only to build software, but how developers thought about building software), as visual studio is starting to smack of university assignments where the idea is only to make it work and not make it useful or intuitive. For example we used to put images in the Resources, now if you do that and then try to load it into a WPF image control, you better know the secret sauce to make it work as image.source = resource.image isn’t going to work (somewhere an image isn’t an image anymore and you have to convert it, the question would be why). Granted they have a bunch of young smart guys, but they are a bunch of young smart guys who don’t have a lot of experience developing apps for a client so they don’t really know what developers need, but I can tell you secret sauce isn’t it. Sometimes I wonder if Anders best work wasn’t Delphi, it was brutally clean and intuitive. Seeing an old hand like Steven Maillet ride back into the game should hopefully be refreshing to say the least and should bring the focus back to enabling NetMF to build the devices and apps that people want and need to develop.


#14

Nice to hear. I’m curious to see new improvements of Netmf.


#15

Pascal is the first programming language I have learned.


#16

Me, I started with PILOT, and learned Basic before playing a bit with Pascal and moving on to C.