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Fastest and easiest way to learn programming


#1

Hello guys how did you learn programming and where would you sujest a beginner to start.
Thanks


#2

I got a book first (Learned Basic on Yamaha). But it was a long time ago.

So get a good book on the language you want to learn and start from page one.


#3

I would recommend against going too fast. Here’s a great free site dedicated to turning mere mortals into crack programmers (or so they say)…

http://www.codecademy.com


#4

The Step-by-Step series of books from Microsoft Press can be a good place to start, if you just want to learn a language. Or even better, the Start Here series, such as this one for C#:

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0790145319210.do

You may also want to look into some online training. Pluralsight.com and Tekpub.com both have pretty high quality video training available, though neither is free (Tekpub does have some free stuff, but most is subscription-based).

Most important thing is to write code. You cannot learn to program without writing programs, so find a book or web site that you’re comfortable with, and write code as you work through the material.

Good luck…it’s a fun field, and one that offers nearly endless opportunities for learning! :slight_smile:


#5

About how long should it take to learn?


#6

I am learning every day for the past 25 years ;D


#7

Well to become productive I mean.


#8

That is totally depends on you, man.


#9

What about 6 months


#10

That is possible.


#11

Ok thanks


#12

You’ll have to define productive :wink: If it means getting a NETMF project to work without too much frustration, not very long (weeks to months 'cause you got us for help). If you mean productive like getting a job as a developer, then several years. Making the transition from “amateur” to “professional” generally requires some kind of college degree and a few years of experience.


#13

You are welcome! ;D


#14

Thanks for the information ransomhall.


#15

I actually enjoyed (what I have watched of) this Channel9 Visual C# series, that was pointed out here earlier. http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/C-Sharp-Fundamentals-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners


#16

@ Brett

Great suggestion! I should’ve thought of that one!

Note that there’s also a series for Visual Basic as well:

http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/Visual-Basic-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners

(VB isn’t currently supported on some .NET Micro Framework stuff, but version 4.2 of the NETMF SDK added VB support, so as soon as that gets integrated into GHI’s offerings, you’ll be able to use either VB or C# to program their mCU boards.


#17

Career wise I would like to suggest starting with C#.


#18

For carrer vise do you guys use c++


#19

C++ requires more discipline and more time to master compared to C#. I think there more .Net jobs available now as well, but you might get a higher pay position having C++ in your arsenal.


#20

C# is the way for all your needs. If you ever need C++ (unlikely) then it is not too hard to learn it from C#.