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Ball Copter


#1

very cool copter, kind of reminds me of the lightsaber training drone

http://www.spiegel.de/video/video-1138178.html


#2

Want it


#3

Makes me think of the Toclafane from Dr Who

I like the idea of having only 1 motor and then using the thrust to maneuver.

Also having the prop enclosed is a good for safey!


#4

thats what i though when i saw the way it moved :slight_smile:

anyway i got the link from this guy http://www.etotheipiplusone.net/ who is a prolific engineer / copter maker / bot builder you name it he’s pretty much done it.
Its a great blog to read. highly inspiring


#5

Very interesting implementation. Thank you!


#6

Seems easier for a beginner…

However I don’t understand how you can prevent the unit to turn around itself
On an helicopter, you have the tail rotor to provide the antitorque.
On a quadcopter, motors are turning in opposite direction by pairs.

How is it achieved on such thing ?


#7

[quote]Seems easier for a beginner…

However I don’t understand how you can prevent the unit to turn around itself
On an helicopter, you have the tail rotor to provide the antitorque.
On a quadcopter, motors are turning in opposite direction by pairs.

How is it achieved on such thing ?[/quote]

Could the thrust vectoring be used to compensate for the rotation?

And a lot of fine tuning of course :slight_smile:


#8

Were there concentric rotors on it? That would eliminate the rotational force…


#9

Godefroi

What do you mean ?
2 rotors turning opposite direction on top of the other ?
I believe this would reduce the efficiency.

I would more follow mhectorgato idea using the thrust control.

Adding one item in my TODO… :smiley:


#10

There looked to be only one rotor, so thrust vectoring is the answer. There is a brief closeup of the “ailerons” in action. Wonder what the frame material is, and how he went about building it.


#11

I guess when it’s applied to rotors, the correct term is “coaxial”. The disadvantages are primarily related to mechanical complexity, but it’s VERY common for model helicopters.


#12

I’m staring at a couple of the $25 SYMA 107s that devhammer has been playing IR games with. They are amazingly stable with this dual rotor system and a gyro. Allows for very precise maneuvering.


#13

Didn’t the guy in the video say he’s only using one motor? At $50+ (motor + ESC + prop) per motor, it’s much more attractive if it can be controlled with thrust instead of dual motors.


#14

@ ransomhall

I don’t think the Symas truly have a gyro in the sense of having a gyroscopic sensor…rather, I think the “gyro” refers to the gyroscopic effect of the coaxial rotors, which tends to automatically stabilize the flight of the heli.

Count me in the group leaning towards the fins/ailerons being used to counter any torque rotation. Neat design…I’m torn between WANT and “creepy”. :slight_smile:


#15

But I count 16 control surfaces, maybe more… This is not a project for one lazy saturday afternoon… :slight_smile:

There is the obvious 8 surfaces that can be seen at 0:51

And then there is the 8 surfaces in the ring around the prop. They can be seen at 0:30 into the clip.


#16

@ devhammer
They probably do have a real piezo gyro. I have “serviced” a few of those sub $20 helis and when they say “gyro” then they do have a gyro.

One of my helis doesn’t have a gyro and rotation around the axis is a real problem. You continually have to adjust yaw. But with a gyro that problem goes away…


#17

In that forum, there is a video for a similar stuff :
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1454102

And wheile the Japanese one has afixed motor and servo controlled “wings”, this one as the opposite :


#18

@ Errol

It’s possible, I suppose. But none of my Symas are self-correcting, as far as yaw goes. The controllers all have a trim knob to tweak the yaw, and as the battery drains, you have to keep tweaking it to keep the heli going in a straight line. Doesn’t bother me, particularly for the price, but unless the non-gyro helis are even worse, I’m not seeing super-stable yaw performance.


#19

Whatever the symas use as a “gyro”, it can get F*&^#d up. One out of two I have will now never stabilize and does a wobbly circle around an invisible vertical axis. This also happens to be the one I tried outside this winter and bounced off the pavement and into the snow… I replaced the blades, and it’s flyable, but a little tricky to get used to :wink: When they say “for indoor use only”, they mean it!


#20

@ ransomhall

Check the linkage between the top rotor and the balance bar. There are some pins at the top of the shaft that have, on both of my symas, broken loose, at which point the heli becomes extremely unstable. Replace the shaft top, and they’re almost as good as new.