Main Site Documentation

4 channel Portable DSO


#1

So how long before you guys make a FEZ version of this :wink:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-channel-Portable-Digital-2MB-USB-Disk-Storage-Oscilloscope-DSO203-ARM-DSO-NEW-/260894476529?pt=BI_Oscilloscopes&hash=item3cbe85c8f1

I am shocked that they give the skiz on it.


#2

I am the fortunate owner of such device. It works well.
However, the graphical interface is a huge pain to use and get used too.
Got mine from seeedstudio.

The hardware and software are opensource so you can improve it :wink:

Also they come not calibrated, and the process to do so takes times. And everytime you upgrade the software, you loose you calibrations…

More data here : http://www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/index.php?title=DSO_Quad


#3

I’ve been eyeing one of those as a potential b’day present request :wink: What is required in the calibration process? If I don’t already have a bench scope is it going to be impossible to calibrate this one? Would this meet most hobbyist needs or should I go ahead and spring for a bench or PC model?


#4

There is 2 sort of calibration:

  • The probe calibration, which is done by hooking up the output signal generator to an analog input, by turning some capacitors. This takes a little time and do not require other tools.
  • The measurement calibration : basicaly you need a standard voltmeter and an adjustable power source.

Both processes are explained in the documentation:
http://www.seeedstudio.com/forum/download/file.php?id=671


#5

A friend just got me DSO Nano v2 for bday. Neat little device!


#6

By the way, just seen on this ebay page “providing 72Mhz analog bandwidth”.
It is false. It is a 72MS/s ADC , that a big difference ! You can expect about 10Mhz bandwith.


#7

Would this be useful in reverse-engineering an IR protocol?


#8

Better use a specialized toy, for 10 times less !

or a real logic analyser:


#9

As you can see in the link:
http://www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/index.php?title=DSO_Nano_v2

It’s capable of only

[quote]
Analog bandwidth 0 - 200KHz
Max sample rate 1Msps 12Bits [/quote]

Now I see this topic is about the “quad”.


#10

[quote]or a real logic analyser:
http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/open-workbench-logic-sniffer-p-612.html?cPath=174
[/quote]
I have actually used SUMP the last week. Ran the logic analyser part on my Sparten3 dev board. It worked OK. I debugged what I needed to debug. But the software can do with a rework.

Zooming in is a pain as the data moves during zoom.
Triggers don’t work when set to 256K buffer.

But it worked.

Might be worth while to write a client in C# for the board…


#11

Not likely to use SUMP myself. I don’t have anything else that uses Java, and not particularly interested in installing (and having to keep updating) a JVM just for one application. Of course, in fairness, I probably have a slight bias towards .NET, given who I work for. :slight_smile:

The short-term cheap solution for me is to just capture the data with the IR receiver, and copy the buffered uint values into Excel. I can write a formula to convert the high values to 1 and the low values to 0, then analyze from there. It’s more work that way, but it won’t require me to buy any new equipment.


#12

If you already have an iPad, this looks like a cool offering.