Microsoft buys LinkedIn

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So, then it’s finally time to sign up now. :wink:

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lol…I broke down and did it a few years ago.

Why would they do this, what’s the value to Microsoft?

Why pay a 50% stock premium?

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@ Duke Nukem - I’m with you. I don’t get this move at all.

I have to chuckle sometimes at the second-guessing that Nadella (and Balmer before him) gets.

It’s certainly conceivable that this acquisition could end badly. The Nokia deal didn’t turn out well, and is hardly the only example of losses that Microsoft’s endured based on acquisitions that didn’t pan out.

But that being said, the failures are always obvious in hindsight. We don’t have the ability to see what the future would’ve looked like without the acquisitions, and it could always have been worse. Very few people have all of the information that went into the decision to acquire LinkedIn, so it’s understandable that we wouldn’t “get” it, since we’re not among them.

Armchair CEOs, unite! :smiley:

“Minecraft” :open_mouth:

Or it’s an "lets buy iit bevor Facebook or Google does.

That’s a definite possibility…wouldn’t surprise me at all.

I think MS want to have the best enterprise social platform by integrating yammer and linked-in

Also, “enterprise social networks” are truly awful. Around here, they’ve made it part of our performance review to participate. Even with that, nobody does.

There are a couple of reasons why you buy a company. First they have a product/technology/patents that you can take further for a profit, and second being they have top notch people that you want in your company, this deal seems to have neither of these, hence why its not making sense to me. The Nokia deal was blown up by Microsoft’s inability to market squat, but they got some great hardware folks and a tons of patents and while they squander the opportunity at the time, having the patents etc means the mobile market door never closes on them.

Microsoft paid almost 4 times as much for LinkedIn as they did for Nokia so either Satya has an unique idea or he is looking for a way to bail out as if this tanks it will likely cost him big, but then again ‘nobody moves, nobody gets hurt’ is no way to run a company.

I think it’s a bailout. I think they did it to keep the company alive and well. Like they did for Apple one upon a time. There may be bad times coming for Linked in, and they reached out for help.

@ Mr. John Smith - by bailout I meant that Satya wants to eject from being CEO at Microsoft, if LinkedIn needed the bail out to keep them afloat, as a Microsoft shareholder, I’d much rather they used someone else’s money then Microsoft’s.

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